A Milwaukee-based power trio named after an obscure Who B-side, Call Me Lightning makes up for its relative lack of size by aggressively pumping up its sound until it approximates Who's Next-style (by way of Black Flag) thunder. (The Onion)

Call Me Lightning of Milwaukee are everything you want in a heavy punk-rock band: they’re urgent, the songs are driving, they’ve got great riffs, and their frontman exudes brilliant personality. (Drowned In Sound)


WHEN I AM GONE MY BLOOD WILL BE FREE
OUT JULY 24 ON VINYL LP AND MP3. VINYL LP INCLUDES FULL ALBUM MP3 DOWNLOAD OR VISIT ITUNES OR YOUR FAVORITE MP3TAILER TO PURCHASE...

WHEN I AM GONE MY BLOOD WILL BE FREE


WHEN I AM GONE MY BLOOD WILL BE FREE
OUT JULY 24 ON VINYL LP AND MP3. VINYL LP INCLUDES FULL ALBUM MP3 DOWNLOAD OR VISIT ITUNES OR YOUR FAVORITE MP3TAILER TO PURCHASE...



Myspace
Facebook

BOOKING
nathaniel lilley somewhere like gmail com with dots added

SHOWS
Thursday, July 22
RECORD RELEASE SHOW
w/Head Of Skulls, Locks
@ Empty Bottle, Chicago IL USA

Saturday, July 24
RECORD RELEASE SHOW
w/John The Savage, Breathe Fire, Centipedes
@ Bayview Post, Milwaukee WI USA




MP3s
Called To The Throne
Bronze Hell



HI-RES PHOTOS
Album Cover



VIDEOS

Club Garibaldi, Milwaukee WI, June 2010
Pure Shit

Locust Street Festival, Milwaukee WI, June 2010
Pizza Party
Ghosts In The Mirror




PRESS


"Not long ago, loving both Led Zeppelin and The Clash was unthinkable. The divisions between classic rock and punk were so deep and wide that closing the gap wasn't merely impossible, it was unnecessary—those on either side were more than happy to be separated. But time has a way of blurring once-clear lines. Recently, bands like Call Me Lightning have drawn from punk and classic-rock history in equal doses, merging the former's spitfire energy with the latter's sense of larger-than-life grandeur. With Soft Skeletons, Call Me Lightning's thrilling follow-up to its 2004 debut The Trouble We're In, it's as if the line never existed at all—the only thing that unites a group of angry, alienated iconoclasts like a fist-pumping punk rock song is a lighter-raising classic-rock anthem, so why not take a bit from both? A Milwaukee-based power trio named after an obscure Who B-side, Call Me Lightning makes up for its relative lack of size by aggressively pumping up its sound until it approximates Who's Next-style (by way of Black Flag) thunder. Exploding out of the gate with the introductory smash-up "Meet The Skeletons," Soft Skeletons maintains an exhilarating adrenaline rush until the propulsive title track at the album's midpoint. The insistent shout-along choruses of "Billion Eyes" and "Bottles And Bottles" make the album's first 15 minutes whir by at an almost reckless pace, and while the rest of Soft Skeletons doesn't quite catch up, it remains a deeply satisfying record that builds a bridge between sweaty basements and roaring arenas." (Review of SOFT SKELETONS LP - The Onion )

"Forget everything you think you know about Milwaukee bands. Call Me Lightning bludgeons any notions of beer, cheese, and bad sports teams by releasing one of the dirtiest punk rock albums in recent memory. Their second album, Soft Skeletons (Frenchkiss), is a successful attempt at trumping 2004’s The Trouble We’re In, an admirable debut that put to use the band’s obsession with the Birthday Party and Les Savy Fav. The result is a tighter, more guitar-driven album that, like its predecessor, is always just a second away from breaking down into a Call Me Lightning-trademarked slaughterhouse chorus. Despite the sudden interest in production techniques, the band stays true to form in all the aspects that made the puzzle fit together in the first place. The terrific energy of their live shows is captured in songs like “Meet the Skeletons” and “Billion Eyes” with their anarchic guitars and pounding drum beats. And at five minutes and 22 seconds, “Soft Skeletons” is Call Me Lightning at their most epic moment. When Lilley screams “Fuck!” near the 4:29 mark, try to pick yourself up because this album can’t be listened to while lying down. Remove all breakable objects, lock the door, and turn up the speakers. - Mike Affholder" (Review of SOFT SKELETONS LP - Alarm Magazine )

"Cor, you wait an eternity (well, a couple of months) for a wailing banshee of a rock record, and then two drop into your lap (almost) at once. Hot on the howlin' heels of The Hunches' blistering 'Hobo Sunrise' comes Call Me Lightning's debut, 'The Trouble We're In'. Call you lightning? How's about I call you a flippin' shitstorm? This Milwaukee three-piece (named after a song by The Who) count former members of Haymarket Riot and the rather splendid Hero Of A Hundred Fights amongst their ranks, and it shows - 'The Trouble We're In' is amazingly accomplished, bearing in mind it's, at base level, a fairly straight-up punk rock-cum-garage record along the lines of The Minutemen being covered by a straight-faced Jesus Lizard. Guitars are battered and skins leathered, as you'd expect, but whereas lesser-experienced acts might slip into chaos, Call Me Lightning maintain control of their compositions. Therefore, whilst the likes of 'We Be Dragons' and 'Asses To Ashes' threaten to veer wildly off the rails a dozen times during their timespan, they're reeled back in by a trio of hardened professionals. You could call it clinical; I call it classic. Add utterly bonkers artwork to the mix (really, the inside of this cover is fucked up), and you have a record that not only breaks away from Revelation's hardcore tradition in eye-popping and jaw-dropping fashion, but also might just creep into the inevitable end-of-year equation." (Review of THE TROUBLE WE'RE IN LP - Drowned In Sound )

"So it’s a relief that the first good band of the week comes soon after. Call Me Lightning (seen at the Red Eyed Fly) of Milwaukee are everything you want in a heavy punk-rock band: they’re urgent, the songs are driving, they’ve got great riffs, and their frontman exudes brilliant personality. He spits into one willing punter’s mouth. Good, clean, hepatitis-rocking fun. Go find and go see." (DiS @ SXSW: the review - Drowned In Sound )